Brief Summary of 7 Rules for Positive Productive Change: Micro Shifts, Macro Results

Esther Derby, in her book, 7 Rules for Positive, Productive Change : Micro Shifts, Macro results, comes out with seven practical rules for organizational change. The 7 Rules are

1. Strive for Congruence
2. Honor the past, present and people
3. Assess what is
4. Attend to networks
5. Experiment
6. Guide and allow for variation
7. Use your self

Esther Derby provides a lot of examples which provides clarity to these rules. Easy to read book – great book to have on Change Management on your bookshelf.
Here is a link to the summary –> Brief Summary of 7 Rules for Positive Productive Change

Advertisements

Brief Summary of “Atomic Habits”

This is a brief summary of Atomic Habits – An easy and proven way to build good habits and break bad ones by James Clear.  An engrossing book as to how we build good habits – through the habit loop of Cue, Craving, Response and Reward.  The 4 Laws of Good habits are – Make it Obvious, Make it Attractive, Make it Easy and Make it Satisfying and how to break bad habits – by Making it Invisible, Making it Unattractive, Making it Difficult and  Making it Unsatisfying.  Also gives a lot of examples to illustrate these laws.  The book is an easy read and good one to have on your bookshelf.

Here is a brief summary of the book –>  Brief Summary of Atomic Habits

Brief Summary of “Enterprise Agility – Being Agile in a Changing world”

This is a brief summary of “Enterprise Agility – Being Agile in a Changing World” by Sunil Mundra.  Pretty comprehensive book covering the need for Enterprise Agility and different aspects of Enterprise Agility –  Mindset and culture, Leadership, Organization structure, process, people, technology, governance and customer.  Enterprises are considered as a living system and Complex Adaptive Systems are dealt with at length.  This is a great book  to understand the different aspects of Enterprise Agility.

Here is a brief summary of the book  –> Brief Summary of Enterprise Agility

Brief Summary of Kanban Maturity Model:Evolving Fit for Purpose Organizations

This is a brief summary of “Kanban Maturity Model:Evolving Fit for Purpose Organizations”. As David Andersen and Teodora Bozheva say, the purpose of the Kanban Maturity Model is to help organizations relief from overburdening, deliver on customer expectations, predictable outcomes and survivability.  Kanban Maturity Model bases itself on the 5 levels of CMMI – but borrows a lot of concepts from Lean/TPS, Real World Risk Institute, Mission Command and Maturity Model of Jerry Weinberg.

The Kanban Maturity Model architecture rests on two dimensions – Maturity Levels on the Vertical and the Kanban Practices on the Horizontal.

The Seven Maturity levels are
Maturity Level 0 – Oblivious, Maturity Level 1 – Emerging, Maturity Level 2 – Defined, Maturity Level 3 – Managed, Maturity Level 4 – Quantitatively Managed, Maturity Level 5 – Optimizing, Maturity Level 6 – Congruent.

The Six Practices are Visualize, Limit WIP, Manage Flow, Make Policies Explicit, Implement Feedback Loops, and Improve Collaboratively and Evolve Experimentally.

Having been in Agile and Kanban coaching for a few years, I feel this book is pretty comprehensive in terms of assessing organizations at different maturity levels and what is needed for organizations to get to the next level. This is a very brief summary of the book – the book is a must read for Kanban coaches.

Here is a link to the summary –> Brief Summary of Kanban Maturity Model

Brief Summary of “More Fearless Change – Strategies For Making Your Ideas Happen”

Mary Lynn Manns and Linda Rising, in their new book “More Fearless Change”  have come out with an excellent sequel to their first book “Fearless Change” – a collection of tactics and strategies to make change happen in an organization.  As the authors say, this book is not a recipe for change but a collection of patterns which will provide ideas to  change the mindsets and behaviors of people involved in change in organizations .  Their first book had a set of 49 patterns and their second had 15 patterns.

Here is a brief summary of the 64 Change Patterns  –> Brief Summary of More Fearless Change

Brief Summary of Clean Language

Clean Language is a communications methodology, developed by David J Grove, a New Zealand ‘Counselling Psychologist’, during the 1980s and 1990s.  Though initially used in psychotherapy,  Clean Language offers helpful techniques to all professional communicators, especially those working closely with others.

Clean Language is a questioning and discussion technique used especially for discovering, exploring and working with people’s own personal metaphors.

Clean Language techniques are aligned closely with modern ‘enabling’ principles of empathy, and understanding, as against manipulative methods of influence and persuasion and the projection of self-interest.Clean Language helps people to convey their own meaning, free of emotional or other distracting interpretation from others.

Clean Language helps clients to discover and develop symbols and metaphors without any content introduced by the therapist/coach/interviewer.  It promotes better clarity of communications, neutrality and objectivity (absence of emotional ‘spin’, bias and prejudice), ease of understanding, and cooperative productive relationships.

Wendy Sullivan and Judy Rees have come out with a wonderful book on Clean Language.  Here is a brief summary of the book  –> Brief Summary of Clean Language

References : http://www.businessballs.com/clean_language.htm

 

 

Brief Summary of Liminal Thinking

This is a brief summary of the book “Liminal Thinking – Create the change you want by changing the way you think” by Dave Gray.  Dave is the author of books such as “Gamestorming” and “The Connected company”.

According to Dave, Liminal thinking is the art of creating change by understanding, changing and reframing beliefs.  The book goes on to talk about the Principles and Practices of Liminal Thinking.

Here is a brief summary of the book “Liminal Thinking”   Brief Summary of Liminal thinking 1.0